Tuesday, March 14, 2017

2017 NSF Cybersecurity Summit - Save the Date

Save the Date!

Please mark your calendar for the NSF Cybersecurity Summit for Large Research Facilities, planned for August 15-17, 2017, in Arlington, Virginia.  

Stay tuned for more information by following the CTSC Blog (http://blog.trustedci.org/), Twitter feed (https://twitter.com/TrustedCI),  and joining the Trusted CI Forum (https://trustedci.groupsite.com/join/)

Information on prior summits is available at http://trustedci.org/summit/.


Sunday, March 12, 2017

CCoE Webinar March 27th 11am EDT: SDN and IAM Integration at Duke



Duke University's Richard Biever and Charley Kneifel are presenting the talk "SDN and IAM Integration at Duke," on March 27th at 11am (Eastern).

Please register here. Be sure to check spam/junk folder for registration confirmation with attached calendar file.
Over the past 4 years, Duke has established SDN bypass networks, an SDN mediated Science DMZ, and other services that rely on identity data about the users and the equipment at Duke.   One such service is the Protected Research and Data Network (PRDN), which makes use of our Identity Management (IDM) services both for Duke researchers and their collaborators at other institutions. 
In this presentation we will discuss the path that Duke took to implement our network, link the various pieces together and the security model used to protect the network and detect unusual activity.  Web based access to services provided inside of our PRDN allow for simple implementation of multi-factor authentication and we will present some novel methods for providing access to both Windows and Linux services inside of a browser.  We will also discuss Plexus, our Ryu based SDN controller, and our plans around the firewall/proxy management application, Locutus, that allows us to support multiple controllers in different spaces of our network (alternative to flow space firewall).  A short discussion of our ability to integrate with GENI/exoGENI sevices, AL2S, and our regional SDN project will be included.
More information about this presentation is on the event page.

Presentations are recorded and include time for questions with the audience.

Join CTSC's discuss mailing list for information about upcoming events. To submit topics or requests to present, contact us here. Archived presentations are available on our site under "Past Events."

Wednesday, February 22, 2017

CCoE and OSG kick off engagement to assess HTCondor-CE


The Open Science Grid (OSG) facilitates access to distributed high throughput computing for research across the US, delivering more than 1.2 billion CPU hours to researchers across a wide variety of projects over the last 12 months. The OSG and CTSC are collaborating to assess the security of HTCondor-CE (Compute Element). The HTCondor-CE is the next-generation gateway software for the Open Science Grid (OSG) and is responsible for providing a network service which authorizes remote users and provides a resource provisioning service. Based on the HTCondor software, this CE is a highly-specialized configuration of HTCondor and relies on less-common components, e.g., blahp, the focus of this engagement. HTCondor-CE was developed and adopted to provide the OSG with a more flexible, scalable, and easier-to-manage gateway software.

The primary goal of the CTSC-OSG engagement is to review blahp (pronounced “blop”), part of HTCondor-CE, and to help ensure its design and implementation are secure - that is, it is free of design errors and will function as intended in the face of malicious entities attempting to coerce it to do otherwise.

Monday, February 13, 2017

CCoE Webinar Feb. 27th 11am EST: Practical Cybersecurity Program for (Smaller) Science Programs

Members of the CTSC team are presenting the talk "Practical Cybersecurity Program for (Smaller) Science Programs," on February 27th at 11am (EDT). Our presenters are Susan Sons, Craig Jackson, and Bob Cowles (speaker info).

Please register here. Be sure to check spam/junk folder for registration confirmation with attached calendar file.
Based on CTSC’s cybersecurity program development guide (see trustedci.org/guide), this webinar addresses practical information security tasks for small and medium science projects. The NSF CCoE’s work spans the full range of NSF-funded projects and facilities, and cybersecurity is certainly *not* a one-size-fits-all endeavor.

Some of the topics covered include:
  • Cybersecurity’s relevance to science projects.
  • The complexity and scope of cybersecurity, and how cybersecurity programs can help you cope with that complexity (and protect your science).
  • A handful of “must-do” (and doable!) action items.
This session is appropriate for principal investigators, program officers, IT professionals in research and higher education, research facility managers, and security professionals interested in information security approaches tailored to particular communities. It is not a detailed technical training. There will be significant opportunities for Q&A.
More information about this presentation is on the event page.

Presentations are recorded and include time for questions with the audience.

Join CTSC's discuss mailing list for information about upcoming events. To submit topics or requests to present, contact us here. Archived presentations are available on our site under "Past Events."

Science Node article on Open Science Cyber Risk Profile

Last week, Science Node published an article on the Open Science Cyber Risk Profile: "Mind the gap: Speaking like a cybersecurity pro."  Dr. Karen Stocks, director of the Geological Data Center at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California San Diego, is quoted in the article:
“It is critical that our scientific infrastructure be reliable and trusted,” says Stocks. “The OSCRP provides the most accessible, focused, and practical guidance I know of for a scientist needing to evaluate and assess their cybersecurity.”
Please see the article for more from Dr. Stocks, as well as others involved in the profile.

Thursday, February 2, 2017

The Report of the 2016 NSF Cybersecurity Summit and Request to Select Dates for the 2017 NSF Cybersecurity Summit!


CTSC is pleased to present the report of the 2016 NSF Cybersecurity Summit to the community. The report outlines progress the community has made based on recommendations from the previous year, attendee details and survey results for both the plenary and training portions of the Summit. The report in its entirety can be reviewed here: http://hdl.handle.net/2022/21161

Additionally, we are currently preparing to kick off planning for the 2017 NSF Cybersecurity Summit for Large Facilities and Cyberinfrastructure. One of our first steps will be selecting a date for this year’s summit, and we would like to hear from you, the community regarding the best dates to meet. The summit will be held in Arlington, VA again this year, at the Westin Arlington Gateway. Please follow the below link to the survey containing the dates we have identified as being available and not conflicting with other conferences in the industry, and enter your choices no later than Friday February 10, 2017: https://www.surveymonkey.com/r/FZBH2H7

Friday, January 27, 2017

Apply for an Engagement with the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence (applications due March 17)

Conducting one-on-one engagements with NSF projects and facilities is one of CTSC’s core activities. To complete the application form and learn more about the process visit our site: https://trustedci.org/application/
In its first 4 years, we have conducted more than 20 one-on-one engagements with NSF-funded projects, Large Facilities, and major science service providers representing the full range of NSF science missions. We support a variety of engagement types including: assistance in developing, improving, or evaluating your information security program; software assurance-focused efforts; technology or architectural evaluation; training for staff; and more. Applications for engagements to be executed in July - December 2017 are due March 17, 2017. (Slots are limited, so this is a hard deadline!) As the NSF Cybersecurity Center of Excellence, CTSC’s mission is to provide the NSF community a coherent understanding of cybersecurity’s role in producing trustworthy science and the information and know-how required to achieve and maintain effective cybersecurity programs.